Greetings from Your Future Instructors

The award-winning and experienced practitioner faculty in Auburn University’s Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering are dedicated to providing the highest standard of education to both our on-campus and online students.

With active research and projects in human-computer interaction, computer networks and operating systems, cybersecurity, software and wireless engineering, high-performance computing, and more, our faculty help prepare our students to be in demand in a competitive job market and to stand out in an innovative industry.

Now, you can study with the best in computer science on your time. Meet the instructors and professors you’ll have once you enroll in our online Bachelor of Computer Science degree program.

Saad Biaz, PhD

Professor
334-844-6307
biazsaa@auburn.edu

Saad Biaz joined the faculty at Auburn University in 2001. He received a doctorate in computer science in 1999 from Texas A&M University and a doctorate in electrical engineering in 1989 from Henri Poincaré University in Nancy, France. He is a professor of computer science and software engineering at Auburn University. His current research is in the areas of distributed systems, embedded systems, wireless networking and mobile computing. In the last seven years, he focused on safe, autonomous and energy-efficient flight of unmanned aircraft systems in densely congested airspace.

Since August 2011, he has been the lead advisor in software and electrical engineering designing the second-generation satellite AubieSat II to be built by students at Auburn University. His research is mainly funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Defense.

In 2013, he received the Provost’s Award for Excellence in Fostering Undergraduate Research and Creative Scholarship. In 2014, Biaz was named the Mentor of the Year by the Auburn University Journal of Undergraduate Scholarship. He was selected in April 2005 to take part in the showcase Research Experiences for Undergraduates on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Biaz was a 1995 recipient of the Excellence Fulbright Scholarship. He has served on the committees of several international conferences and as associate editor for several journals.

Kai H. Chang, PhD

Professor
334-844-6310
changka@auburn.edu

Kai Chang is a professor of computer science and software engineering at Auburn University. His research and teaching interests have been in software testing, software metrics, software quality assurance and application development. He has also been active in Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET) activities as evaluator and commissioner in the Computing Accreditation Commission (2005–2010). Chang received a diploma from Taipei Institute of Technology (now National Taipei University of Technology) and MS and PhD degrees from the University of Cincinnati, all in electrical engineering. He joined the Auburn University faculty in 1986.

Richard Chapman, PhD

Associate Professor, Program Coordinator
334-844-6314
chapmro@auburn.edu

Richard Chapman is the director of the online Bachelor of Computer Science program. He has been a faculty member in Auburn University’s Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering since 1993. He holds degrees from Wake Forest University (BS), Oxford University (BA) and Cornell University (MS and PhD). He has previously served as the department’s undergraduate program director and research center director. He was a co-founder of the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering’s unique Bachelor of Wireless Engineering, and was honored as the Global Wireless Education Consortium’s 2006 Wireless Educator of the Year.

His research interests include mobile application development, pattern recognition, embedded and ubiquitous computing, the Internet of Things, unmanned aerial vehicles and hardware/software formal verification.

James H. Cross II, PhD

Professor
334-844-6315
crossjh@auburn.edu

James Cross teaches undergraduate and graduate courses and directs research in the area of program visualization in integrated development environments. He is the director of the Graphical Representations of Algorithms, Structures and Processes (jGRASP) research project, which focuses on the automatic generation of software visualizations to improve the comprehensibility of software.

Cross is an active volunteer in the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Computer Society, including terms on the IEEE Computer Society’s Board of Governors, Computing Sciences Accreditation Board, vice president of the Education Activities Board, vice president of the Chapters Activities Board and four years as the founding chair of the TCSE Committee on Reverse Engineering. He has served as general chair and program chair for numerous Computer Society and ACM conferences. He served as a co-chair for the Joint IEEE-CS and ACM Computing Curricula project, which produced the 2001 Computer Science volume. He also served on the ACM Java Task Force.

Cross has authored or co‑authored more than 100 technical papers in the areas of software methodology, testing, reverse engineering, visualization, environments and software engineering education. He received his BS in mathematics from the University of Houston in 1971, his MS in mathematics from Sam Houston State University in 1976 and his PhD in computer science from Texas A&M University in 1986.

Dean Hendrix, PhD

Associate Professor
334-844-6305
dh@auburn.edu

Dean Hendrix is an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering and serves as the department's director of undergraduate programs. Hendrix earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and computer science from Jacksonville State University, a master’s in information and computer science from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a PhD in computer science and engineering from Auburn University.

Hendrix has been an investigator on federal grants totaling over $7 million for research in software visualization, computing education and cyber security. He is a member of the Graphical Representations of Algorithms, Structures and Processes (jGRASP) Research Group at Auburn University. jGRASP is a lightweight integrated development environment with automated support for dynamic visualizations of source code and data structures. jGRASP has been shown to be particularly effective in early computer science courses, and is used for teaching and learning in over 400 institutions worldwide. Hendrix regularly teaches courses in data structures and algorithms, database systems and software engineering.

Michael Hollingsworth, MS

Lecturer
334-844-4330
hollimi@auburn.edu

Michael Hollingsworth is a lecturer in the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering at the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. He obtained his BS from the University of Mobile and his MS from Auburn University. He will complete his PhD in the summer of 2018. His research interests include using machine learning to predict classroom outcome by analyzing user activity (as opposed to grades), using machine learning to quickly find adverse drug interactions and creating better electronic textbooks using machine learning and natural language processing.

Hollingsworth has worked in several different sectors of the software development industry for 12 years, including government, health insurance, chemical engineering and others.

Wei-Shinn (Jeff) Ku, PhD

Associate Professor
334-844-6341
weishinn@auburn.edu

Wei-Shinn (Jeff) Ku received his PhD in computer science from the University of Southern California in 2007. He also obtained both the MS degree in computer science and the MS degree in electrical engineering from USC in 2003 and 2006, respectively. He is an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Auburn University. His research interests include data management systems, big data analytics, mobile computing and cybersecurity.

Ku has published more than 90 research papers in refereed international journals and conference proceedings. He is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a member of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Spatial Information.

Bo Liu, PhD

Assistant Professor
334-844-6348
boliu@auburn.edu

Bo Liu is a tenure-track assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Auburn University. He earned his PhD at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2015. His primary research areas are machine learning, deep learning, health care informatics, stochastic optimization and their numerous applications to big data.

In his current research, Liu has several publications in notable journals and conferences, such as the Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems, the Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence, the Conference on Artificial Intelligence, the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Transactions on Neural Networks and Learning Systems, the Association for Computing Machinery’s Transactions on Embedded Computing Systems, the journal Neurocomputing and others. He is the recipient of the Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence’s 2015 Facebook Best Student Paper Award.

Liu's courses cover the following topics: machine learning, artificial intelligence, optimization, advanced algorithms, deep learning and others.

Rodrigo Sardinas

Lecturer
ras0054@auburn.edu

Cheryl Seals

Professor
sealscd@auburn.edu